In: email marketing campaign

Black Friday Email Marketing: Tips to Drive in More Business

Developing a Black Friday email marketing plan is crucial for any company if you wish to do well during the holiday...

Email Marketing: A Balancing Act Between Images and Text

Images are a great way to spruce up your email marketing; they make emails much more visually interesting than plain text, and often increase engagement metrics as a result. However, sometimes email marketers take this desire to design flashy emails too far, and end up turning the entire email into one big image. While these image-only emails may be very visually appealing, they also come with some big disadvantages that you may want to consider before jumping aboard the image-only train.

Digital Overload and the Power of Direct Mail Marketing

How many emails did you receive yesterday? Over 50? Over 100? As email marketing becomes more and more popular as a marketing medium, it is no secret that the number of emails filling up people’s inboxes is growing exponentially. Unfortunately, this is not a good sign for email marketers, because it means that every email has to overcome much more competition in order to get opened, let alone clicked on. We call this “Digital Overload”, and it severely limits the efficacy of email marketing efforts.

Tips for Split-Testing Your Email Campaigns

When I was preparing to send out my very first email campaign, I remember thinking that email marketing would be so simple. Boy, was I wrong! Any seasoned email marketer can tell you that conducting an email campaign, and a successful one at that, is a very tricky process, full of hurdles and straight-up uncertainty. It’s usually pretty obvious when a campaign falls flat on its face, but for other campaigns that seem to do alright, it can be hard to tell if your email marketing is really living up to its potential. Even worse, if you suspect that your emails could be performing better, it can be difficult to figure out exactly what will improve them. If you’ve ever been caught in this predicament, you might want to give split-testing a try.